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Oyetunde Alagbe, M.D. was born and raised in the city Lagos, Nigeria. He had his advance level training in the sciences at St Gregorys College, Lagos and earned his medical degree from the College of Medicine of the University of Lagos. His earlier interest to pursue a career in orthopedic surgery was diverted when in 1994 he was invited by the United States Information Agency (USIA) to participate in the ongoing fight against HIV/AIDS infection. The multifaceted training/workshop he participated in exposed him to the mind-body dichotomy in the context of chronic diseases.

Dr. Alagbe migrated to United States in 1995 to pursue his new interest in mind –body medicine. He enrolled in the special Ph.D. program at the Neuroscience Institute of the Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia and subsequently completed his residency training in psychiatry at the same institution in 2004. He was invited to the Resident’s Science Research Forum (popularly known as the “Breakers” conference) in 2002, where he met Dr. Andrew H Miller, Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Mind-Body Program at Emory University School of Medicine. This influenced his decision to join the mind – body program in the forth year of his residency as an elective student. During this time, Dr. Alagbe worked directly under Dr. Xiaohong Wang, studying the flow cytometric characterization of the p-38 mitogen activated protein kinase system (p38-MAPK) as it relates to neuropsychiatric disorders.

Dr. Alagbe continued his career as a postdoctoral research fellow at Emory University School of Medicine.. His research interest is on the role of proinflammatory signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders in patients with chronic viral infection such as Hepatitis C and HIV/AIDS infection. He aims to demonstrate the fact that activation of the MAPK-p38 signaling pathway plays a major role in the pathogenesis of major depression and may in fact be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of this disease.

Dr. Alagbe has received numerous awards during his career, including the Joe Hope Scobba Award of the Georgia Psychiatric Physician Association in 2005 and the prestigious Presidential National Honors Award for excellence and meritorious service conferred by the President and the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

 

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