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Faculty

This section presents information separately for the clinical psychology postdoctoral program and the clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral program.

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Bekh Bradley, PhD , Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is Co-Director of the Trauma and Genetics Program, which researches the environmental and genetic factors contributing to PTSD risk/resilience in patients seeking care in the primary care clinic at GHS.  The Grady Trauma Project also has a small, clinical treatment program that provides group and individual therapy for Grady patients with PTSD (based in the PTSD Clinic at Florida Hall at GHS).  Dr. Bradley is also the Director of the Atlanta VA Mental Health Service Line and serves as a mentor for fellows.  He received his PhD in clinical community psychology in 2000 from the University of South Carolina. His primary research interests are in PTSD, interpersonal violence, intersection of race and social class, and personality disorders.

Nate Call, PhD, BCBA-D, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) is an Applied Behavior Analyst who is the director of the Behavior Treatment Clinics and at the Marcus Autism Center. As part of his duties as director Dr. Call is the manager of the Severe Behavior Day Treatment Program and the Brief Behavioral Interventions Program. He supervises postdoctoral fellows in the assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders. This work has led him to work primarily with children diagnosed with autism and other developmental disabilities and their families. His specific interests include identifying the basic behavioral mechanisms that influence the occurrence and maintenance of problem behavior, as well as the procedural fidelity with which caregivers implement behavioral interventions for problem behaviors.

Marianne Celano,PhD, ABPP,  Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is the primary clinical and research supervisor for the Child Clinical Psychology positions at the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at CHOA (Scottish Rite and Hughes Spalding sites). Dr. Celano received her PhD in 1986 from the University of Maryland.  Her major interests are in child maltreatment, pediatric asthma, treatment engagement, family therapy, and cross-cultural issues. She is a certified Level 1 trainer in Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). An NIMH funded clinical researcher, who has served as an associate editor of the Journal of Family Psychology and President of APA’s Division of Family Psychology, Dr. Celano is a scientist-practitioner role model for fellows. In partnership with Jordan Greenbaum, MD, the director of the SVB Center, Dr. Celano obtained four years of funding from SAMHSA in 2012 to establish the Georgia Child Traumatic Stress Initiative, which funds some behavioral health services at the SVB Center, as well as workforce development and training for Georgia professionals who work with children who have been maltreated. Dr. Celano has received several teaching awards, including the Supervisor of the Year Award, Emory University Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Outstanding Teaching Award, Psychology Division, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

Claire D. Coles, PhD,  Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Pediatrics), directs both  the Fetal Alcohol and Drug Exposure Clinic, Division of Child, Adolescent, and Young Adult Programs, and the Maternal Substance Abuse and Child Development Laboratory at Emory University, is the primary clinical and research supervisor for fellows in these programs. Dr. Coles received her PhD in Developmental Psychology in 1980 from Emory University and completed a clinical respecialization in 1985. Her major research interests are high-risk infants and young children and behavioral teratology, particularly that resulting from the effect of maternal substance abuse on development. A well-funded and well-published nationally recognized leader in behavioral teratogenics, who served on the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects, she is a scientist-practitioner role model for fellows with an interest in effects of prenatal events and developmental psychopathology.

Marietta H. Collins, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is Clinical Director of the child and adolescent psychiatric services at GHS.  She is the Coordinator of the Psychology Intern Cross Cultural Competence Seminar series and is an NIH funded clinical researcher. Dr. Collins received her PhD in 1996 from Emory University. Her research interests include pediatric psychology, cultural issues, adolescent depression, adolescent reproductive health, and prevention, treatment retention and substance abuse in the HIV/AIDS population.  As a former member of the APPIC Postdoctoral Membership and Review Committee, and former Vice President for Diversity for Division 43 of the APA, she serves as a mentor for minority fellows, interns, and Psychology graduate students. In recognition of her efforts in documenting the racial history of Emory University and GHS, Dr. Collins is a recipient of the Department of Psychiatry’s Distinguished Service Award.

Caitlin Delfs, PhD, BCBA-D, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics), works at the Marcus Autism Center. Dr. Delfs received her PhD in School Psychology from the University of Georgia. She is the program manager of the Language and Learning Clinic: Home-based program, which provides one-on-one behavior analytic services in the home and community settings, and the Community Autism Program, a structured caregiver training program based in applied behavior analysis.  She is responsible for the coordination and supervision of staff, pre-doctoral trainees, and post-doctoral fellows as well as developing and overseeing language and behavioral programming in community settings. Her current research interests include the assessment and treatment of language skills, developing efficient teaching procedures, and assessment of caregiver training models.   

Glenn Egan, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), based in the Psychosocial Rehabilitation Program and the Psychiatry and Law Service at GHS, provides assessment supervision for fellows working with adults with serious mental illness and those doing forensic psychology work. He co-directs the Forensics Seminar.  Dr. Egan received his PhD in 1989 from Georgia State University.  His major interests are forensic psychology, clinical neuropsychology, and schizophrenia.  

Eugene Farber, PhD, ABPP, Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is the Director of Internship Training in the Emory University SOM Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Services at the GHS Infectious Disease Program.  He also directs the Time Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy seminar. He received his PhD from Georgia State University in 1990.  In 2013, he was Chair of the APA Committee on Psychology and AIDS (COPA). His major interests are in HIV related psychotherapy and adaptive functioning, and HIV mental health services outcome research. He has interest in long-term and time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. 

Grace Fong, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to outpatient neurodevelopmental issues. She also provides the neuropsychological assessment supervision for the Pediatric Psychology - CHOA positions. She received her doctorate from American University in Washington, D.C. Dr. Fong’s research interests include fMRI investigation of reward processes and development in clinical populations. Her clinical interests include the evaluation and treatment of preschoolers with neurological and developmental disorders.

Jordan Gilleland, PhD, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics), is the primary research supervisor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology for fellows at CHOA. She received her PhD in 2010 from the University of Georgia and is a former Emory Postdoctoral Fellow. She provides consultation-liaison services in CHOA Aflac Cancer Survivor Program at Scottish Rite. Her primary research interests are in the areas of pediatric cancer survivorship and transition readiness for youth with chronic illnesses.

Chanda C. Graves, PhD, ABPP, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), provides assessment and intervention supervision for child and adolescent psychology fellows in the Infectious Disease Program at Grady Health System. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Howard University in Washington, D.C.  Her current research interests include pediatric psychology, coping with chronic illness, HIV-related mental health services, disparities in access to healthcare, and culturally competent intervention.

Anya Griffin, PhD, is the training coordinator and a clinical supervisor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology for fellows based at CHOA. Dr. Griffin is based at the Scottish Rite campus.  She conducts evaluations, consultations, and psychotherapy for children and adolescents receiving treatment for cancer and blood disorders.  Her primary clinical and research interest areas are pediatric psychology, sickle cell disease, pain management, improving quality of life and medical adherence, and coping with chronic medical conditions.

Christine Hall PhD is a clinical supervisor in the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center for fellows based at CHOA-The Marcus Autism Center.  She received her PhD in 2004 in clinical psychology from Emory University. She works as a part of the Diagnostic and Evaluation Clinic, an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and developmental pediatricians, with a focus on early and accurate diagnosis and treatment planning for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.  Furthermore, she conducts and provides supervision for comprehensive psychological evaluations and behavioral therapy services for children with developmental disabilities, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and behavioral disorders. 

Ann P. Hazzard, PhD, ABPP, Associate Professor (Pediatrics), supervises consultation in the Adolescent Primary Care clinic, which is an elective experience for the Child Protection Center fellowship.  She also mentors fellows interested in pediatric psychology. Dr Hazzard received her PhD in 1981 from UCLA and has been on the faculty in Emory Pediatrics since then.  Her major interests are in child abuse/sexual abuse, children's adjustment to medical illness, enhancement of literacy,  developmental disabilities, divorce-related issues, and integration of behavioral health into primary care settings. As co-founder of Reach Out and Read at CHOA at Hughes Spalding,  an award winning literacy-promotion program, and Board Member of Kate’s Club (child bereavement support agency), she serves as a role model for community involvement and leadership

Sara Hoffenberg, PsyD, ABPP, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) is a senior psychologist and training coordinator in the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center for fellows based at CHOA-The Marcus Autism Center. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology in 2007. Dr. Hoffenberg joined the Marcus Autism Center in 2008. Her primary focus is on diagnosis and treatment planning for children with autism spectrum disorders. She supervises comprehensive psychological evaluations for children with developmental disabilities, anxiety, mood, and behavioral disorders. Dr. Hoffenberg also conducts diagnostic assessments of infants and toddlers as part of ongoing research at the Marcus Autism Center. Dr. Hoffenberg’s primary research interests include early identification, diagnosis, and screening of autism spectrum disorders.

Karen Kuehn Howell, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is Co-Director of the MSA Prevention Program, and supervises fellows on community activities in the prevention of substance abuse. She received her PhD in 1997 in school psychology from the University of Memphis. Dr. Howell develops and implements training modules for a variety of state projects, including developing curricula for veteran child protective service workers in collaboration with the School of Social Work at Georgia State University. With the support of the State Babies Can’t Wait Program, Dr. Howell also recently has developed a curriculum for training physicians on issues related to risky behaviors during pregnancy. She also serves on the State Substance Abuse Prevention Epidemiological Workgroup.

David L. Jaquess, PhD, BCBA-D, Associate Professor (Pediatrics), is Psychology Internship Training Director at The Marcus Autism Center and Director of Training for the Center as a whole; he also serves as the Associate Director of the Emory Postdoctoral Psychology Fellowship. Dr. Jaquess received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Virginia Tech in 1993 with an emphasis in developmental psychopathology and pediatric psychology.  Clinical activities include outpatients who have inadequate nutrition due to food refusal or food selectivity.  Primary areas of research interest include empirical support for behavioral treatment of feeding disorders, community dissemination of effective treatment strategies, and family interventions in pediatric psychology.

Alcuin Johnson, PhD, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics), is a primary assessment and intervention supervisor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology for fellows at CHOA - Egleston. He received his PhD in 1986 from the University of Alabama. He conducts neuropsychological evaluations, consultations, and psychotherapy for youth receiving treatment for cancer and blood disorders. His primary research interests are in the areas of sickle cell disease and neuro-oncology.

Julie A. Kable, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is the Assistant Director of the Fetal Alcohol and Drug Exposure Clinic and the primary supervisor for the developmental clinic work. Dr. Kable received her PhD from Perdue University in 1995 after an internship in Pediatric Psychology at the University of Miami. Dr. Kable’s research interests include behavioral teratology, the psychophysiological assessment of attention, particularly in infancy, and the effects of prenatal exposure to tobacco and alcohol.  She is also involved in international research on effects of prenatal exposures on child development as well as nationally recognized for development of interventions for affected children.

Nadine J. Kaslow, PhD, ABPP, Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Psychology, Pediatrics, Emergency Medicine), Chief Psychologist at GHS, Vice Chair for Faculty Development, and TD of the Emory Fellowship, is the primary supervisor for the adult inpatient unit, Women’s Health Clinical-Research Projects, and the Campus Wide Suicide Prevention Grant. She leads the Postdoctoral Fellowship and Family Therapy Seminars. Dr. Kaslow received her PhD in 1983 from the University of Houston.  Her clinical and research interests are in family violence, suicide, family therapy, and psychology education and training. As Former Chair of APPIC, Past-President of APA’s Divisions 43 (Family), 12 (Clinical), and 29 (Psychotherapy), President of ABPP, and member of the APA Board of Directors, President of APA (2014), as well as being a federally funded and well-published investigator who has received multiple national awards and is Editor of the Journal of Family Psychology, she models the integration of practice, scholarship, and education and the value of active involvement in the larger professional community.

Cheryl Klaiman, PhD,  Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) is a clinical-researcher at the Marcus Autism Center. She received her Ph.D. in School and Applied Child Psychology from McGill University under the mentorship of Jacob Burack. She completed her internship and post-doctoral training at the Yale Child Study Center where she worked with Drs. Ami Klin, Fred Volkmar, Robert Schultz and Sara Sparrow. She joined the faculty of the Yale Child Study Center as an Associate Research Scientist, and then relocated to California where she was the Director of the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Interdisciplinary Care Team at Children’s Health Council in Palo Alto, CA. She joined the team at The Marcus Autism Center and Emory University in January of 2012 where she works on the clinical characterization team among other various research projects. Research interests include early diagnosis and screening of autism spectrum disorders, innovative treatment strategies and clinical trials.

Ami Klin, PhD, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar Professor and Chair of the Division of Autism and Related Disabilities(Pediatrics) is Director and Chief of the Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. He obtained his PhD from the University of London, and completed clinical and research post-doctoral fellowships at the Yale Child Study Center. He directed the Autism Program at the Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine until 2010, where he was the Harris Professor of Child Psychology & Psychiatry. Dr. Klin’s primary research activities focus on the social mind and the social brain, and on aspects of autism from infancy through adulthood. These studies include novel techniques such as the eye-tracking laboratories, which allow researchers to see the world through the eyes of individuals with autism.

Dorian A. Lamis, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), provides assessment and intervention supervision for fellows at the Grady Outpatient Behavioral Health Clinic. Dr. Lamis received his PhD from the University of South Carolina. His primary interests include: assessment and treatment of mood disorders, substance use, and suicidality in adults diagnosed with serious mental illnesses.

Erica Lee, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is the Assistant Director of the Psychosocial Rehabilitation Program at GHS and the primary clinical and research supervisor for fellows at that site. She received her PhD in 2001 from the University of Mississippi. Her primary interests are in working with adults with serious mental illness and in multiculturalism. 

Roseanne Lesack, Ph.D., BCBA-D, ABBP, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) is a senior psychologist in the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Clinic at the Marcus Autism Center. She holds a doctoral degree in school psychology from Fordham University in New York. She completed externship hours in the Language and Learning Clinic at Marcus Autism Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at Marcus Autism Center’s Severe Behavior Treatment Clinics through Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Lesack oversees day treatment and outpatient cases, conducts feeding evaluations, supervises and trains Feeding Program staff and conducts research related to feeding disorders.

Mary Ellen Lynch, PhD, Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is a research supervisor for the longitudinal studies conducted by the Maternal Substance Abuse and Child Development Project.  She received her PhD in developmental psychology from Cornell University in 1982.  Her research interests include parent-adolescent relationships, impact of prenatal substance abuse on child and adolescent development, and social perception processes. Dr. Lynch will be a supervisor for the Prevention activities of the Maternal Substance Abuse and Child Development Project.

Laura Mee, PhD , Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is the primary clinical supervisor for fellows based at CHOA - Egleston in the Solid Organ Transplant and Dialysis Programs.  She is the Director of Consultation-Liaison Services for all transplant patients in the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Egleston. Dr. Mee received her PhD in 1991 from the University of Florida.  Her primary clinical and research interest areas are pediatric psychology, issues with transplant patients, pain management and coping with chronic medical conditions.

Joanna Lomas Mevers, PhD,BCBA Assistant Professor (Pediatrics) is an Applied Behavior Analyst who is the Program Manager of the Severe Behavior Programs at the Marcus Autism Center. As part of her duties as Program Manger she oversees the daily operations of the Day Treatment Program, the Brief Behavioral Interventions Program and Outpatient Program. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in the assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders for children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder or related disabilities. Her specific interests include increasing the social validly of behavioral interventions, increasing efficiencies in caregiver training and understanding the key components to maintain long term treatment effects for behavioral interventions to treat problem behaviors.

Celine Saulnier, PhD, Assistant Professor (Pediatric) and Associated Assistant  Professor (Psychology), is the Clinical Director for Research at the Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. She obtained her PhD in clinical psychology with a specialization in neuropsychology from the University of Connecticut, after which she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center. Dr. Saulnier subsequently joined the Yale research faculty, where she became the Clinical Director and the Training Director for the Autism Program. In 2011, Dr. Saulnier joined the Marcus Autism Center, where she oversees diagnostic evaluations on individuals participating in clinical research. Dr. Saulnier’s research interests include adaptive behavior impairments in children with autism spectrum disorders. She is also co-author of the book, Essentials of Autism Spectrum Disorders Evaluation and Assessment.

Amit Shahane, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences is a supervisor at the Grady Health System Infectious Disease Program. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Oregon in 2009. His clinical interests involve applying  recovery-oriented, evidenced-based treatments for persons living with HIV/AIDS. His research interests involve implementing and evaluating the effectiveness of cognitive-based interventions for insomnia within a behavioral medicine context.

William G. Sharp, PhD,Assistant Professor (Pediatrics), provides assessment and treatment for children in the Pediatric Feeding Disorder Day Treatment and Outpatient Programs at the Marcus Autism Center, where he is also the Program Director.  He provides research and clinical supervision to fellows in the feeding program.  He earned his PhD in Clinical Psychology from University of Mississippi in 2006.  In addition to providing assessments and treatments for youth with feeding disorders, he provides outpatient behavioral services for children with chronic medical conditions.  His research interests include the determinants of help-seeking behavior, the use of motivational enhancement techniques (e.g., motivation interviewing) to increase treatment attendance and adherence, and the application of empirically-supported treatments in applied settings. 

Alice Shillingsburg, PhD , BCBA-D,Assistant Professor (Pediatrics),  Dr. Shillingsburg received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Auburn University in 2006. She is based within the Language and Learning Clinic (LLC) at the Marcus Autism Center. She is responsible for the coordination and supervision of staff, pre-doctoral trainees, and post-doctoral fellows as well as developing and overseeing language and behavioral programming in an intensive treatment setting. Her clinical focus involves behavioral interventions and treatment planning to address a wide variety of common childhood behavioral difficulties as well difficulties in communication associated with developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. Her current research interests include theoretical and practical applications of verbal behavior and the assessment and treatment of language skills particularly strategies to promote language acquisition in children with autism.

Soumitri Sil, PhD, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics), is a clinical and research supervisor in the Division of Hematology and Oncology for fellows based at CHOA.  She received her PhD in 2011 from the University of Maryland Baltimore Country.   She provides consultation-liaison services and cognitive-behavioral treatment for pain management for children and adolescents receiving treatment for cancer and blood disorders at Scottish Rite.  Her primary research interests are in the areas of pediatric chronic pain and developing and evaluating psychological treatments to promote the health and functioning of youth with chronic pain.  

Keith A. Wood, PhD, ABPP Associate Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) and Clinical Director of the Central Fulton County Mental Health Center is the primary supervisor for the Evaluation and Brief Treatment Service at GHS and offers mentorship in administrative supervision. Dr. Wood received his PhD in 1976 from the University of Florida. His major interests are in cross-cultural psychiatry, serious mental illness, and short-term crisis intervention. As a member of enumerable community boards and a person extremely well connected in the Atlanta community, he serves as a model for fellows, particularly minority fellows, for community involvement and leadership.

CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Adult Neuropsychology Fellowship Faculty Supervisors

Benjamin M. Hampstead, PhD,ABPP Assistant Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) is a supervisor in the Adult Neuropsychology Fellowship.  Dr. Hampstead received his doctorate from Drexel University.  He provides clinical services both at Emory and the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, specializing in neuropsychological assessment of a variety of neurological insults including dementia, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and stroke.  Dr. Hampstead’s research utilizes functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural substrates of learning and memory and to assess the mechanisms underlying cognitive recovery and rehabilitation.  

Anthony Y. Stringer, PhD, CPCRT, ABPP/ABCN , Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Director of the Division of Neuropsychology and Behavioral Health provides clinical and research supervision for fellows with a neuropsychology emphasis and leads the Neuropsychology Case Seminar. He received his doctorate from Wayne State University in 1984. He conducts neuropsychological examinations, amobarbital and corticol mapping assessments, and directs the neuropsychology laboratories and the cognitive rehabilitation service. Dr. Stringer conducts research in neuropsychological diagnostic efficacy, ecological validity of neuropsychological tests, cognitive rehabilitation outcome, pharmacologic enhancement of cognition following brain damage, genetic factors in recovery of function, epilepsy, and cognitive prosthetics. As a member of the APA Division 40 Minorities in Neuropsychology Interest Group, he serves as a role model and mentor for neuropsychologists from underrepresented minority groups who are pursuing board certification in neuropsychology. He also is on the ABCN board.

Child Neuropsychology Fellowship Faculty Supervisors

Thomas G. Burns, PsyD, ABPP/CN, ABPN, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Director of the Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA and Director of Clinical Operations in the Division of Neurosciences, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to epilepsy. He received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology. Dr. Burns’ research interests include treatment of pediatric neurological disorders using fMRI. His clinical interests include diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy, brain injury and central nervous system disorders.

Dawn Ilardi, PhD, ABPP, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, CHOA, supervises neuropsychological rehabilitation assessment within the inpatient and day rehabilitation programs.  She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Emory University.  Dr. Ilardi’s research interests are related to the neuropsychological aspects of psychosocial functioning and family and patient adjustment after pediatric acquired brain injury.

Jacqueline M. Kiefel, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to acquired brain injuries. She received her doctorate from City University of New York. Dr. Kiefel’s research interests include evaluation and treatment of children with Duchene Muscular Dystrophy. Her clinical interests include recovery from coma and evaluation of children with brain injuries and spina bifida.

David J. Marcus, PhD, ABPP, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to outpatient neurodevelopmental issues. He received his doctorate from University of Minnesota, Twin Cities in Child Psychology. His research and clinical interests include epilepsy, neurofibromatosis and genetic/metabolic disorders.

Susan McManus, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to acquired brain injuries. She received her doctorate at Georgia State University in the joint Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology & Behavioral Neurosciences programs.  Her clinical and research interests pertain to functional outcomes following acquired brain injuries, as well as acute assessment and intervention to improve neurobehavioral outcomes and academic success.

Kathleen M. O’Toole, PhD, ABPP, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Senior Neuropsychologist and Training Director, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to acquired brain injuries. She received her doctorate in School Psychology with a specialization in Developmental Neuropsychology from Georgia State University. Dr. O’Toole’s research interests include long-term follow-up of children with acquired brain injuries. Her clinical interests include diagnosis and treatment of acquired brain injury and developmental disorders.

Emily Papazoglou, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to neurodevelopmental issues. She received her doctorate at Georgia State University from the joint Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology & Behavioral Neurosciences programs. Her research and clinical interests include adaptive functioning, epilepsy, and brain tumors.

A. Emily Papazoglou, PhDKristine Whigham, PsyD, ABPP, Assistant Clinical Professor (Rehabilitation Medicine) and Staff Neuropsychologist, Department of Neuropsychology, Division of Neurosciences, and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, CHOA, supervises pediatric neuropsychology related to neurodevelopmental issues.epilepsy.  She received her doctorate at Georgia State University from the jointin Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology & Behavioral Neurosciences programs. Her from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology. Dr. Whigham’s clinical and research and clinical interests include adaptive functioning, epilepsy,pre- and brain tumors.post-surgical evaluations of children with epilepsy.

PHYSICIAN TRAINING FACULTY

This section presents information on the physician faculty associated with the training programs, separately for the clinical psychology postdoctoral program and the clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral program.

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Peter Ash, M.D., Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is Director of the Law and Psychiatry Service is active in the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law and co-directs the Forensics Seminar.

Robert Cotes, MD., Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is an attending psychiatrist on the Adult Inpatient Unit and Director of the Clozaril Clinic, GHS.

Barbara D’Orio, M.D., MPA, Associate Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is Director of the Psychiatric Emergency Services and Assistant Clinical Director at Jennifer Holton, M.D., Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is Director of the Child Psychiatry Fellowship.

Kerry Ressler, M.D., PhD, Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences), is Director of the Trauma and Genetics Research Program, GHS.

Ann Schwartz, M.D., Associate Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is Director of the Consultation Liaison Service, GHS, and the Associate Residency Training Director.

Sanjay Sharma, M.D., Assistant Professor (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) is an attending psychiatrist for the HIV/AIDS Program.

Jennifer Wootten, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences is the Medical Director of Evaluation and Brief Treatment Service, GHS.

CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

Charles M. Epstein, M.D., Associate Professor (Neurology) is the Director of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring, Emory Healthcare.

Robert A. Gross, M.D., PhD Professor (Neurosurgery) is the Director of Functional and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Emory University Hospital.

Sandra L. Helmers, M.D., Associate Professor (Neurology) is the Director of the Adult Electroencephalography Laboratory, Emory Healthcare.

Suzette LaRoche, M.D., Assistant Professor (Neurology) is an attending physician in the Emory Epilepsy Center.

Krish Sathian, M.D., PhD, Professor (Neurology, Rehabilitation Medicine) is involved with fellows in functional imaging research.

ADJUNCT PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY AND PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY IN AFFILIATED DEPARTMENTS

The following is a representative group of adjunct faculty and community members who serve as off-site supervisors and/or job mentors for the postdoctoral fellows.

Vivian Auerbach, PhD, ABPP is an adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Psychology at Emory University and Georgia State University. She received her doctorate in 1983 from the University of Houston in clinical neuropsychology. Her clinical practice emphasizes diagnosis and treatment of cognitive disorders resulting from traumatic brain injury. She provides professional development consultation and supervision of fellows with a specific emphasis in neuropsychology.

Michelle Robbins Broth,PhD is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in 2003 from Emory University. Her areas of expertise include intergenerational processes of risk and resilience, maternal depression, early childhood trauma, and HIV in families. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in an interpersonally-based eclectic approach when working with individuals, couples, and families.

Susan Chance, PhD, is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 1999 from Georgia State University and is a psychoanalyst and on the faculty of the Emory Psychoanalytic Institute. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy.

Sarah Dunn, PhD, ABPP is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 2009 from Georgia State University. She supervises interns and postdoctoral fellows for the Grady Nia Project.

Catherine Deering PhD, ABPP is a tenured Professor of Psychology at Clayton College and State University, a staff psychologist at the Atlanta VA Medical Center, and an adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 1991 from the University of Rhode Island. She supervises group psychotherapy and women’s health.

Adriana Flores, PhD is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her Clinical Psychology Ph.D. in 2000 from Miami University and her postdoctoral fellowship at Emory. She is a Forensic Psychologist in private practice and is routinely called upon to consult and testify in high profile court cases. She supervises forensic psychology postdoctoral fellows.

Sobha P. Fritz, PhD, Assistant Professor (Pediatrics), serves as a mentor for fellows in the program.  She received her degree in 2003 in clinical psychology with a focus in clinical child/pediatric psychology from the University of Florida. Dr. Fritz conducts screening evaluations at the Developmental Progress Clinic (Division of Neonatology) at Emory Children’s Center and Hughes Spalding Hospital.  She also works as a consultant at CHOA as a pediatric psychologist.   Her areas of interest include adherence to the medical regimen, coping with a chronic illness, and developmental delays.

Susan Gantt, PhD, ABPP is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, works full-time in private practice, is the Director of the Systems-Centered Training and Research Institute, and is an internationally recognized group psychotherapist and group psychotherapy trainer. She received his PhD in 1984 from Georgia State University. She teaches and supervises group psychotherapy. 

Felicia Goldstein, PhD, ABPP is a Professor in the Department of Neurology. She specializes in neuropsychological evaluation of older adults at the Wesley Woods Center on Aging and the Grady Hospital Memory Assessment Clinic. She received her PhD in developmental psychology in 1982 from Emory University and completed three years of postdoctoral training in neuropsychology. Dr. Goldstein’s research is focused on cognitive disorders affecting older adults. Areas of investigation include vascular risk factors and their influence on cognitive functioning and disease progression.

Elizabeth King, PhD is an adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 1972 from the University of Georgia. She supervises the postdoctoral fellow who works with breast cancer patients.

Carol Kleemier, PhD, is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 1986 from Emory University. She supervises postdoctoral fellows focused on clinical child psychology.

Jean Muench, PhD is a staff psychologist at the Atlanta VA Medical Center and an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 1996 from Kent State University. She provides supervision related to dialectical behavior therapy. 

John Paddock, PhD, ABPP is an adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and works full-time in private practice. A former President of the Georgia Psychological Association, he received his PhD in 1982 from Emory University. He supervises outpatient adult psychotherapy.  

Carli Reis, PhD is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 2010 from the University of Virginia. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in child therapy.

Susan Reviere, PhD, is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and works full-time in private practice. She received her PhD in 1997 from Georgia State University. She supervises psychotherapy for adults with serious mental illness and provides biostatistical support.  

Noelle Santorelli, PhD is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 2010 from Georgia State University. Her major interests are in anxiety, depression, personality disorders, parent-child relations and DBT. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in the provision of a DBT skills training group.

Chaundrissa Oyeshiku Smith, PhD, ABPP is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in Clinical-Community Psychology in 2005 from the University of South Carolina. She currently is a Staff Psychologist at Kaiser Permanente. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in child, adolescent, and family therapy.
Leah Stock-Landis, PhD, is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and works full-time in private practice at the Atlanta Center for Cognitive Therapy. She received her PhD from Georgia State University in 1995. She supervises the dialectical behavior therapy program.  

Martie Thompson, PhD, is a Research Associate Professor at Clemson University and an adjunct clinical assistant professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She is a nationally recognized injury control and prevention researcher. She received her PhD in 1995 from Georgia State University in community psychology. She provides methodological and statistical consultation.  

Calvin Vanderplate, PhD, ABPP is an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and works full-time in private practice. He received his PhD in 1978 from the University of Southern Mississippi. He supervises adult psychotherapy and consultation-liaison work. 

Steven Walfish, PhD is a Visiting Lecturer at Georgia State University, an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and works full-time in private practice. He has published on career development in psychology and managed care. He received his PhD in 1981 from the University of Southern Florida. He supervises adult psychotherapy. 

Carol Webb, PhD, ABPP  is an Emeritus faculty member and past Director of Internship Training at Emory University SOM. As former Chair of the Georgia State Board of Examiners of Psychologists and Past President of the Board of Directors of the ASPPB, she consults on licensure and ethical issues to the fellows and mentors fellows interested in private practice.

Amanda Woods, PhD is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received her PhD in 2010 from Georgia State University and completed her predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She supervises postdoctoral fellows in individual and group therapy in the areas of eating disorders, mood/anxiety disorders, trauma, and dialectical behavior therapy.

Elana Zimand, PhD is in private practice and is an Adjunct Assistant Professor.  She is a licensed psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety and depression primarily for children and adolescents from a cognitive-behavioral perspective, but also including adults and families.  She received her PhD in clinical psychology from University at Albany, SUNY.