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FAQs

How do I secure a mentor?

There are a number of ways in which you can secure a mentor.

  • Ask someone if they will serve as your mentor and if they agree, inform Dr Kaslow.
  • Discuss potential mentors with your immediate supervisor and ask him/her to assist you in reaching out to such individuals.
  • Contact Dr. Kaslow and she will assist in assigning a mentor to you based on your areas of interest.

    Should I have a mentor?

    Yes, regardless of your stage of professional development, it is recommended that you have a mentor. Mentees are not limited to just one mentor. It is possible to have multiple mentors at different stages of development.

    It often is helpful to have a cadre of mentors, rather than just a single mentor, as no one individual can serve all needed mentoring functions. 

      What should a mentoring relationship look like?

      For detailed information, refer to the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Mentoring Program Guidelines. 

      How long does a mentoring relationship last?

      The duration of a mentoring relationship depends on the quality and nature of the interaction and the needs of the mentee.  Such relationships may be of relatively short duration (i.e., one year) or last a professional lifetime.

      What happens if there is a conflict or concern with the mentoring relationship?

      For detailed information about addressing problems in the mentoring relationship, refer to the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Mentoring Program Guidelines. 

      Is there departmental support for mentors?

      There is not specific financial support for faculty members to serve as mentors for their more junior colleagues. Engaging as a mentor is viewed as a component of one’s professional service to the department, the institution, and one’s colleagues. As such, it is recommended that mentoring relationships be included in one’s Service Portfolio description. 

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